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The Perception & Action Podcast - Sports Science & Psychology Talk

Exploration of how psychological research can be applied to improving performance, accelerating skill acquisition and designing new technologies in sports, driving and aviation. Hosted by Rob Gray, professor of Human Systems Engineering at Arizona State University, the podcast will review basic concepts and discuss the latest research in these areas.
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Now displaying: May, 2015

**Please see new & improved website at http://perceptionaction.com/ 

 

May 26, 2015

Since the early 1980's, there have been several vision training programs developed which propose to improve the vision of athletes resulting in an associated improvement in their sports performance. Do these training programs actually work?  Or could practice time be put to better use?  In this episode, I review the research that has evaluated the effectiveness of these programs.

 

Links to articles mentioned in podcast:

Do generalized visual training programmes for sport really work?

High-performance vision training improves batting statistics for University of Cincinnati baseball players

Enhancing Ice Hockey Skills Through Stroboscopic Visual Training

The Impact of a Sports Vision Training Program in Youth Field Hockey Players

Improved vision and on-field performance in baseball through perceptual learning

The BASES Expert Statement on the Effectiveness of Vision Training Programmes

 

More information

http://www.perceptionactionpodcast.libsyn.com/

My Research Gate Page (pdfs of my articles)

My ASU Web page

Podcast Facebook page (videos, pics, etc)

Twitter: @Shakeywaits

Email: robgray@asu.edu

Credits:
Opening music: "Shake Some Action" by The Flamin' Groovies via freemusicarchive.org

 

 

May 14, 2015

Sports talk is littered with phrases related to our eyes.  We talk of great court vision, a good eye at the plate  and seeing the ball well.  But just how critical is vision to an athlete?Do professional athletes see better than we do?  Can you play sports effectively if you have poorer than 20/20 vision? In this episode I dive into the topic of research in vision in sports.

Links to articles mentioned in podcast:

Popular Science Monthly tests Babe Ruth

St. Louis Cardinals slugger Pujols gets Babe Ruth test

The visual function of professional baseball players

Dynamic visual acuity: a possible factor in catching performance

The role of visual perception measures used in sports vision programmes

Size of the Visual Field in Collegiate Fast-Pitch Softball Players and Nonathletes

Motion perception and driving: predicting performance through testing and shortening braking reaction times through training

Interaction of hand preference with eye dominance on accuracy in archery

Is optimal vision required for the successful execution of an interceptive task?

 

More information

http://www.perceptionactionpodcast.libsyn.com/

My Research Gate Page (pdfs of my articles)

My ASU Web page

Podcast Facebook page (videos, pics, etc)

Twitter: @Shakeywaits

Email: robgray@asu.edu

 

Credits:

Opening music: "Shake Some Action" by The Flamin' Groovies via freemusicarchive.org

 

 

 

May 11, 2015

A preview of the new Perception & Action Podcast. An exploration of how psychological research can be applied to improving performance, accelerating skill acquisition and designing new technologies in sports, driving and aviation. Hosted by Rob Gray, professor of Human Systems Engineering at Arizona State University, the podcast will review basic concepts and discuss the latest research in these areas.

More information:

http://www.perceptionactionpodcast.libsyn.com/

My Research Gate Page (pdfs of my articles)

My ASU Web page

Podcast Facebook page (videos, pics, etc)

Twitter: @Shakeywaits

Email: robgray@asu.edu

Credits:

 

 Opening music: "Shake Some Action" by The Flamin' Groovies via freemusicarchive.org

 

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